Dynamic Stories: Kylie’s Shoes

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Kylie and I have known each other for a long time. This young woman lives in Wyoming and works in the theatre. Kylie has cerebral palsy and has used a power wheelchair and speech generating device since a young age. She has recently started using dynamic seating. I spoke with Kylie and her mom, Chele, by phone.

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ISS 2018 & Dynamic Seating: Enhancing Participation through Movement

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

The International Seating Symposium takes place each March and this year returned to beautiful Vancouver, Canada. I had the privilege to present a pre-symposium half-day course on Dynamic Seating: Enhancing Participation through Movement with Jessica Presperin Pedersen, OTD, MBA, OTR/L, ATP/SMS. We had a full house with participants from around the world interested in Dynamic Seating. In addition to the presented content, we had a significant amount of questions and interaction with the attendees. We also had a variety of dynamic seating products in the room for the attendees to explore at the end of the session.

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A Busy Education Season

Greg Peek

This year the industry compressed all three of our major shows, as well as some smaller ones, into a much tighter time frame.  We started this year’s show season on January 23rd and just ended on March 11th.  We attended:

  • The NuMotion NLC Expo in Houston.
  • The Travis Medical conference in Georgetown, TX with Michelle Lange teaching a class on Dynamic Seating.
  • The NSM sponsored class in Oklahoma City where Michelle Lange and Ginny Paleg each taught classes.
  • The International Seating Symposium (ISS) in Vancouver, British Columbia where Michelle Lange and Jessica Pedersen taught a class on Dynamic Seating.
  • The National Seating and Mobility, NSM Seating Symposium in Orlando.

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Determining Resistance: Head Support

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

This blog is the third in a series on determining the optimal resistance when using dynamic components. The first blog in this series addressed determining resistance in the Dynamic Rocker Back Interface (DRBi) and the second blog addressed finding the optimal resistance when using Dynamic Footrests. In this final blog, we shall turn to the Dynamic Head Support Hardware.

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Dynamic Stories: An Interview with Robert’s Parents

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Robert is a Dynamic Seating old-timer. This 27 year old man has been using Dynamic Seating for about 10 years now. I had the privilege of speaking with Robert’s parents, Jeffrey and Mary Elizabeth, on the phone recently.

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Clinician Interview: Brain Power!

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

I had the privilege to present with a group of colleagues on Dynamic Seating at the International Seating Symposium last year. One of my co-presenters was Suzanne Eason, OT/L who works at St. Mary’s Home in Virginia. Suzanne is very interested in the impact of movement on brain development. I recently had a conversation with my friend.

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Peanut Butter and Jelly: Dynamic Footrests and Securing the Feet

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

In a recent blog, we discussed how, just like Bread and Butter, use of a Dynamic Back requires the use of a Pelvic Positioning Belt to maintain the position of the pelvis during movement of the Dynamic Back. Well, just like Peanut Butter and Jelly, use of Dynamic Footrests requires the feet to be secured in order for client forces to activate this dynamic component.

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Bread and Butter: Dynamic Backs and Pelvic Positioning Belts

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Just like Bread and Butter, Dynamic Backs and Pelvic Positioning Belts go together. Dynamic Backs are designed to allow movement at the pelvis and torso in response to client force and then return the client to a neutral starting position. A key component is the pelvic positioning belt, which is designed to maintain the pelvis in as neutral a position as possible in relation to the seating system. When that seating system moves, the pelvic belt is even more critical in maintaining pelvic position.

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