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Clinical Indicators and Assessments

Who Can Benefit from Dynamic Seating?

seating dynamics blog 131b how to know if a client needs a dynamic rocker back

How Do I Know if a Client Needs a Dynamic Back?

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In earlier blogs we have addressed key topics such as “What is Dynamic Seating ” and “Dynamic Seating: Clinical Indicators .” In this blog, we will focus on Dynamic Backs.

how to know if clients need dynamic seating

How Do I Know if a Client Needs Dynamic Seating?

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In earlier blogs we have addressed key topics such as “What is Dynamic Seating” and “Dynamic Seating: Clinical Indicators.” In this blog series, we will take a look from the other side – what can you currently observe that indicates this person could benefit from Dynamic Seating?

Can Dynamic Seating Really Help GI Issues?

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Dynamic Seating has so many clinical indicators. Research and clinician experience also show a benefit to the gastrointestinal system.

seating dynamics blog how to know if a client needs dynamic footrest

How Do I Know if a Client Needs Dynamic Footrests?

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In earlier blogs we have addressed key topics such as “What is Dynamic Seating ” and “Dynamic Seating: Clinical Indicators .” In this blog, we will focus on Dynamic Footrests.

Seating Dynamics blog how to know if a client needs dynamic head support hardware

How Do I Know if a Client Needs Dynamic Head Support Hardware?

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In earlier blogs we have addressed key topics such as “What is Dynamic Seating ” and “Dynamic Seating: Clinical Indicators .” In this blog, we will focus on Dynamic Head Support Hardware.

Seating Dynamics blog decreased energy conservation and weight gain

Dynamic Seating: Decreased Energy Consumption and Weight Gain

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It has been established that Dynamic Seating absorbs and diffuses force. This intervention is often used to prevent client injury and equipment breakage, as well as to provide movement.

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FAQ: When is Dynamic Seating NOT Clinically Indicated?

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Are there instances when Dynamic Seating is NOT indicated for a client? A while back, a colleague of mine stated, “why wouldn’t we let a client move?” We are wired to move and seek out movement for a variety of reasons. Personally, I’m not a big fan of sitting still.

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Dynamic Seating: Clinical Indicators

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Dynamic seating has many potential applications. This blog covers the clinical indicators relevant to absorption and diffusing force, protecting the wheelchair user and more.

Comfort vs. Pain in Funding Documentation

Comfort vs. Pain in Funding Documentation

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If I go to the doctor for any reason, someone on staff always asks if I am in pain and, if so, what level of pain I’m in. Pain is a big deal. Beginning in the 1990’s, increased attention was given to pain and it was even dubbed the ‘fifth vital sign.”

Reducing Overall Extension

Determining if a Dynamic Back is Appropriate

My Client isn’t Moving as Much – What Happened?

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Dynamic Seating is designed to provide movement; however, client movement may actually decrease after using Dynamic Seating for a while. Why?

Diffuse Force and Reduce Overall Extension

Using Dynamic Seating To Diffuse Force And Reduce Overall Extension

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As discussed in our last 2 blogs, dynamic seating is commonly used to prevent breakage of the wheelchair seating system and frame. Another common application of dynamic seating is to diffuse force and reduce overall extension.

Preventing Equipment Breakage

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Supplier Interview – Dynamic Seating Down Under with Astris PME, New South Wales, Australia

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Meet Venesha Moodley and Laurie Grace of Astris PME and learn how they are using dynamic seating in New South Wales, Australia.

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Darcy – Reducing Agitation and Providing Sensory Input through Movement

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See how a Dynamic Rocker Back has not only satisfied Darcy’s need to rock in his wheelchair, but improved safety, sitting tolerance, function and decreased equipment breakage.

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Sara: a mover and a shaker!

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Sara has a diagnosis of cerebral palsy and seizures. She has a long history of destroying footrests with aggressive movement in her wheelchair, Dynamic Seating has helped.

Prevent Equipment Breakage Part 1

Dynamic Seating To Prevent Equipment Breakage, Part 1

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Dynamic Seating is often used to prevent equipment breakage. Some clients who use wheelchair seating exhibit increased muscle tone. This is common in clients with diagnoses such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and Huntington’s disease. Increased muscle tone or spasticity is caused by an imbalance of signals from the central nervous system to the muscles. In addition to increased muscle tone, primitive reflexes and involuntary movements may also be present.

Prevent Equipment Breakage Part 2

Dynamic Seating To Prevent Equipment Breakage, Part 2

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Our last blog addressed using dynamic seating to prevent equipment breakage, particularly with clients who exhibit increased muscle tone. These clients often display strong extension, sometimes referred to as an “extensor thrust.” This intermittent and strong force can lead to breakage of the wheelchair seating system and frame.

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A Dynamic Journey – a solution to wheelchair breakage and so much more

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This blog addresses various aspects of Dynamic Seating – seating that provides movement in response to client forces. Just how do people actually find this solution? Well, many caregivers and health care professionals are working with a client who has broken their seating system, mounting hardware and/or mobility base. Wheelchair breakage may occur repeatedly over time.

Preventing Client Injury

Preserving Joint Integrity through Dynamic Seating

Preserving Joint Integrity through Dynamic Seating

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Daniel is a teenage boy with the diagnoses of cerebral palsy and seizures. He has significantly high muscle tone and has had varied success with tone management over the years. If his feet are not strapped to the footplates, he extends at his knees and his feet are then hanging far in front of the footplates. This increases the turning radius of the wheelchair, places his lower legs at risk of injury, and leads to a loss of position of his pelvis. As a result, his feet have been strapped into shoeholders for most of his life. This positioning has kept his feet on the footplates, but has created other issues.

Concussions Don't Just Happen in Football

Supplier Interview: Concussions don’t Just Happen in Football

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Recently I had a nice conversation with a colleague about Dynamic Seating. Joe McKnight is Director of Business Development in California, Nevada, and Arizona for Numotion, and he has been in the wheelchair seating and mobility field for a long time – probably longer than he would like to admit! Having that much experience provides a unique view. Joe states that “how we practiced 30 years ago and how we practice now should be different. We need to re-evaluate how we are doing things and how we need to change.”

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Can Dynamic Seating Prevent Client Injury?

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Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS Our past two blogs have addressed clinical benefits of Dynamic Seating, specifically the evidence…

Providing Movement

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Supplier Interview – Dynamic Seating Down Under with Astris PME, New South Wales, Australia

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Meet Venesha Moodley and Laurie Grace of Astris PME and learn how they are using dynamic seating in New South Wales, Australia.

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Clinician Interview: Kaye Donec – diffusing tone, preventing breakage, and providing movement

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Meet Kaye Donec, former Individualized Services Team Leader of the Adult Therapy Program at the Disability Services Department of Communities in Western Australia, and learn how she used Dynamic Seating in her career.

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Darcy – Reducing Agitation and Providing Sensory Input through Movement

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See how a Dynamic Rocker Back has not only satisfied Darcy’s need to rock in his wheelchair, but improved safety, sitting tolerance, function and decreased equipment breakage.

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Sara: a mover and a shaker!

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Sara has a diagnosis of cerebral palsy and seizures. She has a long history of destroying footrests with aggressive movement in her wheelchair, Dynamic Seating has helped.

Provide Vestibular Input Part 1

Dynamic Seating To Provide Vestibular Input, Part 1

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Dynamic Seating moves in response to client forces. Many clients move, not due to increased extensor tone, but rather for the explicit purpose of moving. We all tend to seek out movement. We are wired to move and movement has so many benefits. Movement can calm, arouse, work muscles and provide comfort by varying our position. From a sensory standpoint, movement provides vestibular input.

Provide Vestibular Input Part 2

Dynamic Seating to Provide Vestibular Input, Part 2

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Our last blog discussed how dynamic seating can provide vestibular input for clients. Vestibular input can, in turn, calm agitated clients and help sub-aroused clients be more alert. Movement can also increase comfort and general muscle activity.

Seating Dynamics Wheelchair

The Importance of Movement for All

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Movement is normal. We are born moving and continue to do so our entire life. Our bodies are designed to move – it is actually easier to move than to stay still! When movement is prevented or restricted, we experience negative physiological effects. Movement is a good thing, however many of us are not moving enough.

Improving Postural Control

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Dynamic Stories: Carl – improved wheelchair driving and computer use

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Dynamic Seating is designed to provide movement; however, client movement may actually decrease after using Dynamic Seating for a while. Why?

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Can Dynamic Seating Improve Postural Control?

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Did you know that research has also demonstrated that Dynamic Seating can improve postural control and function?

Improving Function

Seating Dynamics blog decreased energy conservation and weight gain

Dynamic Seating: Decreased Energy Consumption and Weight Gain

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It has been established that Dynamic Seating absorbs and diffuses force. This intervention is often used to prevent client injury and equipment breakage, as well as to provide movement.

Seating-Dynamics-Client-Carl-113B-header

Dynamic Stories: Carl – improved wheelchair driving and computer use

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Dynamic Seating is designed to provide movement; however, client movement may actually decrease after using Dynamic Seating for a while. Why?

Jonathan and tone that won't quit

Dynamic Stories: Jonathan and Tone That Won’t Quit!

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Jonathan is a young man with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy. Dynamic Seating added to his wheelchair has helped him address tone that just won’t quit.

Dynamic Seating Evaluation

Taylor sitting in dynamic wheelchair

Evaluation, Simulation and Dynamic Seating Trials

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Recently a therapist asked me how she could recommend Dynamic Seating components if she didn’t actually try these with a client. Great question! It is not typically realistic to conduct Dynamic Seating trials as one would need to place Dynamic Seating components on a client’s wheelchair for trial and often the frame would need to be modified to accept these components.

Addressing Dystonia

Young girl with cerebral palsy sitting in Dynamic Seating wheelchair

Dystonia and Dynamic Seating

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Many clients with increased muscle tone also display dystonia. Dystonia is “characterized by involuntary, patterned, sustained, or repetitive contractions of opposing muscles, resulting in abnormal twisting body movements and abnormal postures”.

Seminar Watch Now

Webinar Series: Muscle Tone, Tone Management and Dynamic Seating Intervention

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This series of three webinars, presented by OT Michelle Lange, explores the relationship between Muscle Tone, Movement, Wheelchair Seating Systems and Dynamic Seating.

The Restraint Debate

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Dynamic Seating and the Restraint Debate

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There are times when a wheelchair seating and mobility team, after careful evaluation and problem-solving, makes specific recommendations – only to hear that these well thought out interventions may be considered to be a restraint. So just what is considered a restraint and how does this affect Dynamic Seating?

Dynamic Backs and Pelvic Positioning Belts

Bread and Butter: Dynamic Backs and Pelvic Positioning Belts

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Just like Bread and Butter, Dynamic Backs and Pelvic Positioning Belts go together. Dynamic Backs are designed to allow movement at the pelvis and torso in response to client force and then return the client to a neutral starting position. A key component is the pelvic positioning belt, which is designed to maintain the pelvis in as neutral a position as possible in relation to the seating system. When that seating system moves, the pelvic belt is even more critical in maintaining pelvic position.

Dynamic Footrests and Securing the Feet

Peanut Butter and Jelly: Dynamic Footrests and Securing the Feet

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In a recent blog, we discussed how, just like Bread and Butter, use of a Dynamic Back requires the use of a Pelvic Positioning Belt to maintain the position of the pelvis during movement of the Dynamic Back. Well, just like Peanut Butter and Jelly, use of Dynamic Footrests requires the feet to be secured in order for client forces to activate this dynamic component.