Clinician Interview: Brain Power!

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

I had the privilege to present with a group of colleagues on Dynamic Seating at the International Seating Symposium last year. One of my co-presenters was Suzanne Eason, OT/L who works at St. Mary’s Home in Virginia. Suzanne is very interested in the impact of movement on brain development. I recently had a conversation with my friend.

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Dynamic Stories: Time to Rock and Not Roll

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Phillip is a mover and a shaker – literally! This adult with developmental disabilities likes to move. He lives at a residential facility in Delaware. Years of rocking in his manual wheelchairs have left a trail of destruction. He has broken seating systems, mounting hardware, and wheelchair frames as a result of repeated and often strong movements. Phillip is currently using a tilt in space manual wheelchair with a linear back and an off-the-shelf cushion. When he rocks, he tends to move the entire chair across the room, so the staff lock the wheels. The result? He rocks with such force that the solid tires have repeatedly broken where they contact the wheel locks!

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Dynamic Stories: An interview with Daniel’s Mom

Daniel is a 17 year old young man with the diagnosis of cerebral palsy. He has been successfully using dynamic seating for over 5 years now. He started with a Kids Rock dynamic manual wheelchair. He currently uses a tilt in space manual wheelchair with a dynamic rocker back and dynamic footrests. I sat down with his Mom, Mary, to ask her some questions.

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Will my client break the Dynamic Seating?

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Dynamic Seating is often used to prevent equipment breakage, specifically the wheelchair frame and seating system. The Dynamic components absorb strong, repeated, sudden, and/or sustained forces, hence protecting vulnerable areas of the seating and mobility base. This was addressed in two prior Blogs (Dynamic Seating to Prevent Equipment Breakage, part 1 and part 2). But what about the Dynamic Components themselves? Just how durable are these?

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Can I get this paid for? Part 4: Dynamic Headrest

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Our last blog provided suggested wording to be used in documentation to obtain successful funding for Dynamic Footrests. In the last of this series, we will look at specific wording for various applications of Dynamic Headrests.

These examples do not replace competent evaluation. Choose the wording that matches an individual’s specific needs and modify accordingly to reflect a specific client’s needs. I find it helpful to begin with a brief definition, as reviewers are often unfamiliar with this technology. For example:

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Can I get this paid for? Part 3: Dynamic Footrests

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Our last blog provided suggested wording to be used in documentation to obtain successful funding for the Dynamic Rocker Back. In this blog, we will look at specific wording for various applications of the Dynamic Footrests.

These examples do not replace competent evaluation. Choose the wording that matches an individual’s specific needs and modify accordingly to reflect a specific client’s needs. I find it helpful to begin with a brief definition, as reviewers are often unfamiliar with this technology. For example:

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Dynamic Seating To Prevent Equipment Breakage, Part 2

blog 4 photo.JPGMichelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Our last blog addressed using dynamic seating to prevent equipment breakage, particularly with clients who exhibit increased muscle tone. These clients often display strong extension, sometimes referred to as an “extensor thrust.” This intermittent and strong force can lead to breakage of the wheelchair seating system and frame.
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Dynamic Seating To Prevent Equipment Breakage, Part 1

Michelle L. Lange, OTR/L, ABDA, ATP/SMS

Dynamic Seating is often used to prevent equipment breakage. Some clients who use wheelchair seating exhibit increased muscle tone. This is common in clients with diagnoses such as cerebral palsy, traumatic brain injury and Huntington’s disease. Increased muscle tone or spasticity is caused by an imbalance of signals from the central nervous system to the muscles. In addition to increased muscle tone, primitive reflexes and involuntary movements may also be present.
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